Beading back in Time Blog Hop

 

beadingbackintime

 

I was really excited when I heard about the Beading back in time blog hop run by co-hostesses Lindsay Starr and Sherri Stokey.

It’s going to be split in to 4 parts run across the year with different themes through history. The first topic is Pre human. instantly I knew that I would be focusing my designs on fossils and rocks. I’m a bit of a secret rock nerd and have boxes full of stones, crystals and fossils I’ve gathered from places I’ve visited. I love anything to do with geology.

ammonite

My all time favourite are ammolites.

ammolite

ammolite2

I decided I wanted to try and recreate the beautiful effect of these opalised fossils in some beads. I have seen numerous tutorials around the web with instructions for creating polymer clay opal. I found out the materials used and set about trying to make my own version.

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They are earthenware clay fired without glaze and set with mica in resin. I think they could have done with a couple of layers of mica rather than just one to fill out the pools a bit more, but I’m thrilled that they worked reasonably well and turned out so sparkly!

blueberribeads 08

For my next make, I decided I wanted to make some fossils. I have quite a few shells and sea lilies that I have collected myself, but imagine finding something as amazing as this…

fish fossil

I find it incredible that so much detail can be captured in rock, and it fascinates me to imagine the things that have been on the earth millions of years before us.

So I wanted to make something that had an ancient feel about it. I made some rough stone shapes in raku clay and glazed them with copper and crackle glazes and resist.

blueberribeads 05

My favourite is definitely this darker version, the background colour has been created by smoke from the fire with glaze used to draw out the design.

blueberribeads 01

I also attempted a trilobite, although I don’t think it was quite as effective as the fish skeleton.

blueberribeads 04

I’ve had great fun taking part in the first instalment of the Beading back in time hop, Thank you to Lindsay and Sherri for organising such a great event! If you’d like to see what they and the rest of the participants made, follow the links…

Co-hostess: Lindsay Starr of Phantasm Creations

Co-hostess: Sherri Stokey of Knot Just Macrame

Kelly Rodgers of Beadin’ Black & Blue

Michelle McCarthy of Firefly Design Studio

Caroline Dewison of Blueberribeads

Melissa Trudinger of Boho Bird Jewellery

Sue Kennedy of SueBeads

Stephanie and Chris Haussler of Pixibug Designs

Jen Cameron of Glass Addictions

Jean Wells of Jean A. Wells Artisan Jewelry

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15 Comments

  1. Oh, how fun!! I love the polymer opals, but my favorite is that dark fish skeleton. It is fantastic! Thanks for playing!

  2. Wow, I love those polymer opals! And your fish skeleton, especially the dark one, has a very prehistoric look.

    This is the first I’ve ever heard of an ammolite –fascinating. As a geologist, I’m really curious about where that ammonite photo in the rocks was taken?

  3. Fantastic Caroline! I love your ammonite “pools”, but my favorite is the raku trilobite that you don’t like. Funny how that is!

  4. Amazing pieces. The experimentation and research that goes into this kind of art is always such a mystery to me. You really have it all down to an “art.”

  5. I always wanted to study geology properly, it’s such a fascinating subject! The ammonite picture was taken in Dorset, UK, down on the jurassic coast.

  6. Those polymer opals are amazing but I love the little fish fossil!!! The trilobite is cute too but even in real life they are not as cool as the fish

  7. Awesome creations! Love the fish skeleton and the trilobite! I can totally agree with you on the ammonites! That is an amazing specimen!

  8. OOoohhh these beads are AWESOME!!! My favorites are the fishies…so ADORABLE and COOL! Thank you for sharing!

  9. I like the opal tide pool pieces. Wow. Mica. what a cool thing. And I always like your rake and resist pieces. How big are they?

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